Abasatana and the Three Monsters

This is my first parable.  I hope you like it.

In the land of Karash, known as the Land of the Five Jewels, there were four beautiful cities at each point of the compass.  At the center, on top of a small mountain, stood the capital city where the king of Karash lived.

The city to the east was a spectacular city of green within gold.  It looked as an emerald shining in the sun, and its people danced.

The city of the south was a dark and mysterious city of red and black.  It looked as a ruby red city that lit the night sky with its fires, and its people sang songs at night.

The city of the west was a glimmering sapphire that shown blue from its rooftops against the setting sun.  From this city, the smell of great spices arose at night, for its people were known for their fine cuisine.

The city of the north was always white, both by day and by moonlight.  It looked as a diamond as it sat in the snow, and its people were quiet and told each other stories by the fire inside their homes.

The capital was called the City of Every Color, which honored all of the colors and traditions of the land of Karash.  The king sat atop a gold thrown with four steps.  The first step was green for the city of the east.  The second step was red for the city of the south.  The third step was blue for the city of the west.  The final step and floor that the thrown set on was white marble for the city of the north.

Visitors to the kingdom were always told of these things.  For, the king sits upon all cities, and needs all cities.  Should any step be missing, the throne would not sit so high, the first step being as important as the last.

One day, there came terrible news that three monsters had attacked the kingdom of Karash.

Three messengers arrived at almost the same time to the throne room, one from the east, one from the south, and one from the west.

The messenger from the east, wearing fine green robes, told of a beast that came with the wind.  It would throw its people into the air, and they would fall and be killed.

The king was horrified by this story, and asked what the city had done to save itself.

"We have not saved ourselves, but rather, we have been saved by this creature.  For, when we examined the people it has killed, we find that they had committed misdeeds.  We have built a temple to the creature and worship it. The creature takes away sin. We have come, not for help, but to ask the king to worship it as well."

Thanked, the messenger from the east stepped aside.

The messenger from the south, wearing fine red robes, told of a beast that came in the air and breathed fire.  It would burn houses, and then snatch people up when they ran, and eat them.

The king was terrified by this story, and asked what the city had done to save itself.

"We have not saved ourselves, but rather, we have been saved by this creature.  For, when we examined the people it has killed, we find that they were wealthy and did not give to the poor.  We have built a temple to the creature and worship it.  The creature takes away greed.  We have come, not for help, but to ask the king to worship it as well."

Thanked, the messenger from the south stepped aside.

The messenger from the west, wearing fine blue robes, told of a creature that came from the river and spouted poisoned water.  Any that the water would touch would be scalded and melt away,  and the nearby crops would wither and die.

The king was infuriated by this story, and asked what the city had done to save itself.

"We have not saved ourselves, but rather, we have been saved by this creature.  For, when we examined the people it has killed, we find that they were fat and gluttonous.  We have built a temple to the creature and worship it.  The creature takes away our gluttony and laziness.  We have come, not for help, but to ask the king to worship it as well."

Thanked, the messenger from the west stepped aside.

Then the king looked around, and asked where the messenger from the city of the north was.  The king's leader of the guard said that no messenger from the north had come.

"I fear the north has not worshiped whatever beast came to destroy them, and none are left," said the king.  "We shall sleep tonight, and consider what to do."

That night, the king had terrible dreams of creatures coming from all of the cities to devour him for not worshiping them.

In the morning, before the messengers of the east, south, and west, the king stood above them in front of his gold throne.

"I could not sleep last night, for the creatures haunt my dreams.  I will worship them all so that we may all sleep in peace," said the king.  "I will send messengers to the north to discover their beast, and we shall erect a monument to it here in the capital, as well."

That day, three sculptors carved three sculptures in front of the thrown.  On a green silk sheet was carved a wind beast of gold.  On a red silk sheet was carved a fire beast of black.  On a blue silk sheet was carved a water beast of crystal. On a white silk sheet was a block of marble that had not been carved yet.

The king bowed before all of the sculpture shrines, as did the messengers and all of the people in the court.

The next morning, the king called the three messengers before him and said, "You three have been good messengers and are blessed both by the temples in your cities and the shrines here.  You are the most qualified and protected to go to the north.  Set out with haste, and return to tell us what to carve on the fourth shrine."

Just then, the doors of the throne room were opened and a soldier of the guard rushed in and over to the leader of the guard and spoke hastily.

The king, waiting to hear what had happened, sat on his gold throne before the shrines.

"Your magesty," said the leader of the guard, "a messenger has arrived from the north.  The messenger is their own leader."

"Send him in at once," cried the king!

A majestic man with a gold beard and wearing a white silk flowing robe walked in.  In his left hand was a book with a pen bound to it with leather.  His right hand rested on the hilt of a sword.

"Good leader of the city of the north, Abasatana, we have heard of monsters in every city.  They brought the news of their particular beast and the temples that they erected.  We have likewise erected shrines to them here for protection.  But we do not know your beast.  Please, tell us what you have done, so that we may protect the entire kingdom and complete the white shrine," explained the king.

Abasatana looked at the shrines, one by one, and fixed his eyes on the incomplete white shrine.

"Your majesty, we have indeed been attacked by a beast.  It is white, covered in hair, and blows a cold winter wind which freezes people.  I shall tell you what was done.  But first, I must complete one task," said Abasatana.

He lifted his book, and turning to the last page, began writing with the black pen.  A few moments later he finished.

After Abasatana finished the writing, he closed the book, and bound the pen back to it with leather.  He then walked over to the white block of marble, and laid the book down on it.

He paused for a moment, and touched the book, and said, "Let us now complete the story which I have just written in this book.  For I have written what will happen now happen in this court, that it may come to pass now before your very eyes."

The messengers looked to one another, and the king's eyes widened.

The king spoke in a rising voice, knowing that his kingdom was safe in the hands of the wisdom of the man before him, "Abasatana, you are one of the wisest leaders in the kingdom.  What you have written will come to pass in this kingdom, and it shall be the order of this throne that no man may oppose it!"

At this, the court whispers grew silent.

"Now tell us," said the king, "what the city had done to save itself and what is to come to pass."

Abasatana slowly pulled out his sword and held it up to the light so that it reflected brilliantly in the sun coming in through the windows.  The man, Abasatana, was brilliant in the rainbow of colors shining from over his head in his white robe.

"We have saved ourselves.  For, when we examined the people it has killed, we found that they had no particular fault that we did not also have.  We have built army against the creature, and slew it.  We have taken away the creature that brought death to our people.  It has been cut into a thousand pieces and burned in our fires, and we now tell the story of how we defeated the beast. We have come, not for your help, but to save the entire kingdom."

Abasatana paused as everyone marveled at the story, and then said, "And now I will tell you what is written on the last page of the story.  It says, 'And then, Abasatana swung his sword and shattered all of the shrines except for the white shrine."

And as he said the words, his sword swung down and into an arch, and shattered the green, red, and blue shrines.

The entire court gasped, and even the king fell back in fear!  The guards pulled out there swords, fearing that Abasatana may attack the king.

Abasatana slowly put his sword back into its place on his belt, and spoke.

"And the last of the book says, 'And the white shrine of the book stood, symbolizing knowledge and action over ignorance.  And the king ordered the armies of the land to accompany Abasatana to the city of the east, the city of the south, and the city of the west to kill the beasts as was done in the north and then to destroy the temples.  For the people of Karash are not cowards, and listen to wisdom not fear."

The king lowered his head, as did everyone else in the court.

The king descended down from his thrown, and prostrated himself before Abasatana.  The leader of the guard came next, followed by all of the guards.  The messengers came next, and the rest of the court followed them.

From that day forward, the uncut white block of marble stood directly in front of the king's thrown.  And before mounting the steps, the king, and every king after him, prostrated himself to it before sitting on the throne.